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with an earthy sophistication, Donovan’s work sinuously integrates form and color to create imagery that grows up from and flows across the page.
— Camille LeFevre, City Pages
 
 
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ABOUT

Emily Donovan loves to travel, but her heart belongs to Minnesota. The state's North Woods and the cycle of the seasons are both influential and essential to her batik art, which relies on wax and handmade dyes made from foraged materials. Having grown up learning about specialized tools and craft methods from her father, who built custom etching and lithography presses, Donovan studied art history and visual art at the University of Minnesota with an emphasis in printmaking and painting. Her process of hand dyeing creates what she calls a "living mark," tracking the movement and infusion of her pigments into paper fibers and encapsulating her experiences and discoveries in the outdoors.

 

 
 
 

THE PROCESS

Natural pigments have been used for centuries in many places throughout the world.  The recipes to create color from nature have been passed down from one generation to the next and were once found in the back of cookbooks. This practice to make natural pigments are now revived and is a great resource to explore the environment and the many different sources to find color that can be found outside, even in your own backyard.